Matablog

The Yo La Tengo / “Parks & Recreation” Connection Finally Explained

April 24th, 2014 at 10:52 am by Gerard

As you might’ve read elsewhere, Yo La Tengo — appearing as the combo Bobby Knight Ranger — are featured in tonight’s season 6 finale of NBC’s “Parks & Recreation”.  Given that many of you know even less about show business than you do fitness, personal hygiene or the importance of getting up before 2 in the afternoon, I’m gonna graciously catalog the various scenarios on how exactly, this TV booking came to be.

1) In 2000, the sleeve to Yo La Tengo’s cover of George McRae’s “You Can Have It All” featured an at-the-time struggling NYC model-slash-actress, Amy Poehler, previously best known for her work on an obscure basic-cable comedy program. Shortly after the release of this chart-topping single, she became a regular cast member on “Saturday Night Live” and has appeared in such Palme d’Or winners as “Deuce Bigelow : Male Gigolo” and “Mr. Woodcock”.

Cynics might say Yo La Tengo inclusion on tonight’s “Parks & Rec” is Ms. Poehler’s way of returning the favor.  And that’s how cynics are, always looking for some shitty reason to diminish any sort of achievement.

2) “Parks & Recreation” co-creator Michael Schurr is one of the founders/main minds behind Fire Joe Morgan.  Yo La Tengo’s name is said to have something or other to do with baseball.  Ask someone who likes sports, we’re a record label.

3) Popular recording artists are frequently asked to appear on television programs  (eg. Roger Miller in “Quincy, M.E.”‘s “On Dying High”, Dave Navarro’s sporadic appearances in “Sons of Anarchy”).

Glad I could clear that up for everyone.

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2 Responses to “The Yo La Tengo / “Parks & Recreation” Connection Finally Explained”

  1. el matador fan Says:

    Why do you feel the need to justify yourselves?

  2. Gerard Says:

    we’re simply trying to boost other labels’ self-esteem by making them seem professional and well-adjusted by comparison.