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Archive for November, 2012

Tonight’s Ceremony Show Moved

By Claire T on Friday, November 30th, 2012

Photo Credit: Alvin Carrillo

UPDATE:  Ceremony’s  Allentown, PA show at the Maingate Nightclub on Monday, Dec. 3 has been cancelled. Refunds will be made available at point of purchase. In lieu of this show, the band will be playing Bethlehem, PA at the Space for Secret Art (ask a punk for the address) on Monday, December 3 along with Stick Together and United Youth.

While tonight’s Ceremony show at the Sinclair* (Cambridge, MA) has unfortunately been cancelled, Ceremony will be playing a show tonight at Anchors Up!

Friday, November 30 / Ceremony at Anchors Up! (58 River Street in Haverhill, MA).
Also on this bill: New Brigade, Beware, Minus, Dead End Path, Soul Search, Rude Awakening, Bane
Go here for further show details.

In addition, Ceremony will be playing live on the air this afternoon on WZBC (Boston College).
If you’re in the Boston area, tune in at 3:30pm EST via 90.3FM
Otherwise, you can tune in online at WZBC.org or iTunes Radio under College/University.

*While the Sinclar show this evening has been canceled, it has been rescheduled for Titus Andronicus on January 27. Ceremony will not be on this bill. Refunds are available at point-of-purchase; tickets for the original show will be honored at the rescheduled January 27 show. Further information can be found here.

A.C. Newman – “I’m Not Talking” video

By Gabe on Friday, November 30th, 2012

Today Pitchfork debuts the first video from A.C. Newman’s album Shut Down The Streets (album available for purchase), a brilliantly subtle, hilarious take on “I’m Not Talking” (directed by The General Assembly):

Iceage To Play London’s Shacklewell Arms This Sunday

By Judge on Friday, November 30th, 2012


Following last night’s headline London show, Iceage are revealed as secret headliners for a punk all-dayer at the Shacklewell Arms in Dalston on Sunday, December 2. The day is co-hosted with our friends SexBeat as part of Freedom from Torture Presents… – a festival of music taking place throughout December in support of survivors of torture, with all proceeds going to the charity.  Iceage are joined by Eagulls who are revealed as the other special guests.

On the day there will be an incredible raffle, with prizes from Matador, 4AD, Rough Trade, XL, Wichita, Mute, Warp, Bella Union, Domino and more who are also coming together to support the event and Freedom from Torture.

Tickets cost £7 with all proceeds going to Freedom from Torture.  Tickets are available to buy from: www.freedomfromtorture.org/presents

Also performing on the day are Mazes from Manchester, Vision Fortune from south London, Chain of Flowers from Cardiff and Boneyards from Brighton and London.  All the bands are looking forward to being part of the amazing live music for an incredible cause, Chain of Flowers’s Joshua Smith said: “Freedom from Torture speaks up for the survivors of torture and organised violence, alerting people of the unthinkable experiences these people have been through. These events are an incredible way to spread the word of what this charity does for these people, and we are really happy to be a part of it.”

Shacklewell Arms, 71 Shacklewell Lane, Dalston, London, E8 2EB

Tickets £7 from http://www.freedomfromtorture.org/events/6794

ALL proceeds go to the Charity Freedom From Torture

Stagetimes:

Iceage 10:15- 11:00
Fair Ohs DJs
Eagulls 9:00- 9:45
Sexbeat DJs
Mazes 7:50- 8:30
Tough Love DJs
Vision Fortune 6:50-7:20
Sauna Youth DJs
Chain of Flowers 5:50-6:20
Matador DJs
Boneyards 5:00-5:30

Interpol – Turn On The Bright Lights – An Oral History

By Patrick on Thursday, November 29th, 2012

Pitchfork has posted an incredible oral history with Interpol about Turn On The Bright Lights. It features Paul Banks, Carlos Dengler, Sam Fogarino, Daniel Kessler, and Matador co-founder Chris Lombardi talking in detail about the formation of the band, the New York music scene from 1998 to 2002 and the making of the album.

Read it here:

The Tenth Anniversary edition is arriving in the hands of mail order customers on December 4, and will be in stores December 11.

Where were you in 2002? An Interpol Spotify Competition

By Naomi on Thursday, November 29th, 2012

Cast your mind back to 2002. Lisa ‘Left Eye’ Lopez had just died, Jimmy Carter won the Nobel Peace Prize and The Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers was the highest grossing movie. Meanwhile, Turn On The Bright Lights topped all the major top album lists (not least Pitchfork) and cemented it’s place as one of the albums of the decade.

To create a real sense of that time and why Turn On The Bright Lights was such an important album we’d like to create a seminal list of the best tracks of 2002.

Make a Spotify playlist of your favourite tracks from 2002 and post it as a comment to this message. The best playlist will be chosen via a heated debate in the Matador offices. The creator of the winning playlist will win a signed copy of the Turn On The Bright Lights: The 10th Anniversary Edition Double LP as well as a video of Sam Fogarino listening to their playlist. Really.

To jog your memory, here’s a little playlist showing what Matador was up to in 2002.

Turn On The Bright Lights Screening Event and Round Table Discussion

By Naomi on Wednesday, November 28th, 2012

To celebrate the release of TURN ON THE BRIGHT LIGHTS: THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION, the IFC in New York are hostng a very special event on Monday 3rd December, the eve of the record’s digital release*. A screening of rare footage from early Interpol performances and music videos will be followed by a roundtable discussion about TOTBL and it’s position in the musical landscape of the early 2000s, featuring Sam Fogarino and Daniel Kessler from the band, Pitchfork founder Ryan Schreiber, Other Music co-owner Josh Madell and moderated by NYU Professor Amanda Petrusich. This promises to be a special evening and will also be your first chance to get your hands on the record itself in all it’s glory.

Get your tickets here.

*Please note: Unfortunately, due to a manufacturing delay, the CD and vinyl street dates have pushed a week from Dec 3(UK)/4(US) to Dec 10/11. Digital street date remains the same, and there will be advance physical stock at the event!

Turn On The Bright Lights IFC Screening and Round Table Discussion

Wrapping Up Singles Going Home Alone 2012 / Introducing SGHA 2013

By Gerard on Wednesday, November 28th, 2012

The 2012 edition of our Singles Going Home Alone subscription series is almost done and dusted. After 7″‘s from Stephen Malkmus & The Jicks / L.A. Guns, OBN III’s, The Men, Wounded Lion and Jesu, SGHA #6 is Kurt Vile and Meg Baird performing a new version of ‘Constant Hitmaker”s’ “Classic Rock In Spring” backed with the duo’s cover of Michael Chapman‘s “Another Story”.

The 7th and final SGHA single of 2012 is bonus 7″ of two previously unreleased songs from the early 80′s Boston-based/Tampa-formed trio Primitive Romance, “Ice” b/w “Flags Drop”

The Kurt & Meg single will ship to subscribers along with the Primitive Romance single and a special commemorative tote bag in early December. SGHA 12 was limited to 750 copies and is completely sold out. However, we’re taking orders now for next year’s series.

For 2013, we’ll be doing a single every month, plus a special secret bonus 7″ at the conclusion, plus a yet-to-be-determined container for all the singles (wooden box?  carrybag made from human flesh? a tote bag Altamont manufacture for free? ). The first single in the series is a pair of new songs from Cheap Time founder Jeffrey Novak, followed by an entry from Matador alumni Superchunk in February (one original backed with a cover of SS Decontrol’s “Glue”). The tentative schedule looks like this :

Jan 29: Jeffrey Novak – I Never Knew I Knew So Much / B-7
Feb 19: Superchunk – I Hate History / Glue
Mar 26: Cian Nugent – TBA
Apr 23: Lower Plenty / Dick Diver – split 7″
May 21: Bits Of Shit – TBA
June 11: Royal Headache - TBA

Info on the subsequent 6 singles is coming after the New Year, but we’re pretty excited by what we’ve got lined up.

US price for the 13-disc +  MYSTERIOUS carrying case 2013 subscription will be $85 inclusive of shipping (12 X $5 plus $25 shipping) – subscribers will receive one single every month.

Canadian price is $95 inclusive of shipping, also mailed every month

Rest of world is $105 inclusive of shipping, however, we’ll be mailing those orders as installments of 3 singles every 4 months, otherwise the postage costs would be prohibitive.

Just like last time, we’re only making 750 subscriptions available. I think they make an awesome holiday gift, however that’s not meant to be a hint of any sort. I mean, I think I’m getting one for free. But if you don’t work for the label, you might wanna act fast.

SGHA 2013 – subscribe here.

Get To Know Your Local Independent Retailer Vol. 25 – Vintage Vinyl

By Michael on Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

I’ve only been to St. Louis once. And on that one trip I made one stop. And that one stop was Vintage Vinyl. First impression: “Holy shit this place is enormous.” Enormous but manageable. Like a less intimidating Amoeba (intimidating meaning, “How the fuck am I going to walk out of here without spending a few hundred bucks?”). I made out with all sorts of stuff. A Phil Collins CD, a Therapy? cassette, some used soul and r&b LPs, a George Jones record, shitloads of HC 7″es and some other things that didn’t really make any sense in the same bag (perhaps even a DVD movie starring Will Smith, but that I won’t confirm). Needless to say, this place has one of the most diverse selections I’ve ever thumbed through. But be forewarned; it’s not really a place you can just pop in. Browsing at Vintage Vinyl is a commitment. I spoke with VV co owner Tom “Papa” Ray about all sorts of stuff. Dig it.

(FYI that last photo is Tom with none other than Peter Tork.)

1. Tell us briefly about your store.
Vintage Vinyl has been operating in the Delmar Loop of St. Louis since 1980—we saw ourselves that year as the ‘alternative’ home-town urban record store.  Currently, we are a 7800 square foot mothership for the intelligent music lover. We made a point of opening on the ONLY ‘racial neutral zone’ of our city, with an eye to pleasing both a mainstream/independent rock clientele, as well as the deep-dish urban market for soul/jazz/blues/gospel, as well as reggae & hiphop. In other words, we ended up selling more Bobby Womack than Cat Stevens.

2. What got you into the independent record store business?
In the middle/late 70s, my partner Lew Prince was running the Finest Record Chain in Colorado. I was doing work in the retail/wholesale/indie side of things, promotion and club-work in Manhattan at that time. We both wanted to return to St. Louis; we saw it as justly-fabled and half-forgotten foundation music city, and we could use the contacts and knowledge both of us had acquired working in the industry towards doing our own store.

3. Who are some of your favorite contemporary stores?
In our own town, we have several. Euclid Records & Apop Records comes to mind here. Love my musical compadres in the AIMS Coalition, to which we belong.  There are GREAT stores around the country, to say the least. Last time I was New Orleans, Domino Sounds Record Shack was proper!  Jason with Sonic Boom in Seattle, Boo Boo Records in Cali, Shake It in Cincinnati, Waterloo in Austin. Music Millennium in Portland seem to have inspired a nest of indie stores in that town. These are just a few of my favorite stores.

4. How have things been going from a business perspective?
In 2000 we recognized that although our city had the most square footage per capita given over to retail music of ANY city in the USA, those chain and mall stores were not our future or really or then present-day competition. The internet and digital download okey-doke was seen as a sobering reality. Since then, we have continued in business by being a destination store in St. Louis, and evolving to where now, I can smile and say, “NO! CDs are not ‘going away’ anymore than vinyl ever did” We’ve always done both, and wish to be the alternative to on-line shopping in ways that option can never connect to the customer. As far as business now, 2012?? Better than selling jet-skis in rural areas, I’d say.

5. What do you think spells the survival for an independent record store today?
Beyond knowing your market, be adept at both new and used sales in all physical formats. Try and be the garden of earthly musical delights wherever you pitch your tent, and being able to work magic helps also.

6. What are some of the coolest thing labels have done with you? Instores? Promotions? Sales?
We’ve released world-quality music on a number of labels over the past 33 years; Charlie Parker Live In D.C. 1953, crucial blues & hip hop releases in the 80s; currently our label Sound System Records has quite fine reggae releases by U-Roy, a great dub set by The Roots Radics, 2 LPs by Nicodemus.  We partnered with SONY in the 90s to do a 1,000 piece edition, double LP giveaway of a live Pearl Jam set as part of promotion with local corporate radio; in-stores/live appearances with everyone from Tommy Lee To Willie Dixon, Queens Of The Stone Age to Ike Turner, Marilyn Manson to Charlie Louvin. 100s of in-stores, Eddie Levert of the O’Jays, George Clinton, Black Angels, Peter Tork, the great Rudy Ray Moore, AKA the Dolemite, etc etc. Two in-stores that were a gas with the Insane Clown Posse. Eazy E, Jason Mraz. All styles served here, y’know??  Our 20th anniversary party was with the legendary Jamaican band The Skatalites.  Oh, we’ve had our fun.

7. Why do we need record stores?
Bootsy Collins answered this one day, a few years ago in Cincinnati: he stood at a table where the owners of indie stores around the nation sat, and quietly with great conviction said, “I know things are tough sometimes, but your communities NEED you to do what you do, because you-carry-the-music-culture in your towns.  BEST BUY don’t know a damn thing about Bootsy Collins, but you do!  SO PLEASE. I know it’s hard, but keep goin’ on. When it seems it’s not worth it, PLEASE, keep just goin’ on. So, as the man say, Who Feels It Know It, true??” There are continual moments at my store where the collective sense of musical community amounts to a mystic beating heart that is part of this River City called St. Louis: where Chuck Berry still walks and plays, where Miles Davis started, where Ike Turner walked the bar playing guitar, where the original Stooges played their final show. I recall once, during the Rodney King business, there was a sense of dread and tenseness in people. I remember seeing a customer walk in, visibly agitated, and he said to me,  I just HAD to come in here and cool off, and check out some music.  Sometimes, I’ll recommend taking a Thelonious Monk record: now call me in the morning if it’s not better.

8. What kind of taco is your favorite?
I like some grilled snapper in mine.

9. Who are your top 3 favorite bands right now?
It depends on the genre of music.  I just saw soul legend Lee Fields do a hellacious set a few weeks back. At Red Rocks last month, I experienced as great a performance as I’ve ever seen by Winston Rodney, The Burning Spear, which is to say as great and powerful as reggae ever gets. Sure would love to see a 2nd release by Them Crooked Vultures.  I just heard the pre-release of Psychedelic Pill by Neil Young, and it’s killer. And when I was in my teens and 20s back in that day, I HATED Neil Young. So, it’s all over the place.

10. What is your favorite thing about your store?
Too many things. It has been a great personal blessing to work with the employees we’ve had for more than 3 decades, many hundreds of talented people, and the customers too. I’m always struck by how essentially NICE our customers always are.

11. What are your goals for the future of your store? Long term and short.
Long Term and short term?  To thrive and continue enjoying this musical aquarium we’ve built here on the Delmar Loop. As a Baptist preacher might say in the pulpit, GLORY!

Photos courtesy of Louis Kwok

Tanlines new video and single, Fallon and tour dates

By Gabe on Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

Wrapping up an incredible year, Tanlines today release the self-directed, self-selfy video for “Not The Same” from their debut album Mixed Emotions (buy it here):

Also today, the “Not The Same” single went live on iTunes, featuring an extended version of the song (also utilized in the video) and a remix by DJ Spoko.

Next week, on Thursday December 3rd 6th, the band will make their late-night television debut on Jimmy Fallon. Set your TiVers.

Finally, the band wrap up a year of touring with a handful of upcoming shows, including a headline date at New York City’s Webster Hall:

11/28/2012 Boston, MA @ The Paradise // PLEASE NOTE VENUE CHANGE – tickets
11/29/2012 New York, NY @ Webster Hall – tickets
11/30/2012 Washington, DC @ The Black Cat – tickets
12/1/2012 Philadelphia, PA @ Union Transfer – tickets

Char siu with dipping sauces and sauted baby bok choy

By Patrick on Sunday, November 25th, 2012

Char siu is Cantonese barbecued pork and something I’ve wanted to make for a long time. This is a two-day preparation. The recipe is mainly based on posts in this thread on eGullet, as well as some comments in this post on the Food Canon blog from Singapore.

I used pork belly instead of loin, resulting in a lot more fat and fatty, chewy pieces.

Serves 2

1 lb pork belly, sliced into 1″ x 2″ strips containing fat and lean, pricked all over with a fork

Marinade:

(a) marinade base:

1/2 cup dark soy sauce
1/2 cup water
1/2 stick cinnamon
2 1/2 star anise
1 tbs cloves
1 tbs cumin seeds
1 tbs coriander seeds

(b) other marinade ingredients:

1 tbs dark soy sauce
1/2 tsp five spice powder
1 1/2 tbs brown bean sauce
1 tsp brown sugar
3 cloves of garlic, mashed and lightly chopped
1/4 tsp – 1/2 tsp salt
pinch of MSG (optional)

First make the marinade base. Simmer the first 1/2 cup dark soy sauce with the water and whole spices for an hour. Be sure to keep the flame very low so that the whole spices don’t burn. It should be a bare simmer.

Discard the whole spices, and combine the liquid marinade base in a medium-sized bowl with the other marinade ingredients and mix thoroughly. Taste and adjust balance for sweet / salty.

Add the pieces of pork to the bowl and combine thoroughly with your hands, rubbing the liquid into the pork. Put in fridge and marinate overnight.

About 2 hours before you want to eat, remove pork chunks from bowl, reserving marinade (discard the pieces of garlic). Thread the meat on skewers, leaving a small space between chunks. Use a set of two skewers for each set of chunks of pork, so that you will be able to turn them easily. (I used wooden skewers similar to these, which needed soaking in water so they wouldn’t burn – if you have metal ones, so much the better – just make sure they’re long enough to stretch to both sides of your roasting pan.)

Put oven rack in middle of oven and preheat to 300F.

Basting liquid:

1 1/2 tbs hoisin sauce
1 tbs brown bean sauce
1 tbs Shaoxing rice wine
1 1/2 tbs honey
1/4 tsp five spice powder
Excess marinade

Mix thoroughly, and adjust sweet / salty balance to taste.

Put about 1/2″ water in a roasting pan narrow enough to balance the skewers on, and place the skewers on top so that the pork is above the water. Place in oven.

Bake for 1 hour 10 minutes, turning every 20 minutes.

Now raise the heat to 425F and brush the meat with the basting liquid. Cook for 20 minutes more, basting frequently.

Carefully take the pork from the oven and remove from skewers when cool enough to handle. Chop into 1/4″ pieces and set on a plate to rest for at least 30 minutes. Do not cover or keep warm – char siu should be eaten at room temperature!

Above: dipping sauces: light soy sauce, hoisin sauce, Chinese mustard.

Serve with steamed rice, and a vegetable foil – something like this baby bok choy (recipe from Steamy Kitchen).